Goodbye Visual C++

Seems the new CFF Explorer will be compiled with GCC. More than one reason for that. Visual Studio 2008 doesn’t support anymore Windows 98 and NT4 without giving an explanation. The incompatibility is due to a major operating system version inside the Optional Header of the PE and to the fact that the C runtime library makes some unsupported calls. I could of course patch the whole thing and manage to make it run on those operating systems, but why should I? This is not my job. It should be Microsoft’s job to offer an alternative compiling method which provides backward compatibility. What angers me is that Microsoft not only doesn’t care about backward compatibility, they don’t even bother explaining why they had to remove the support for those operating system. The GCC (Mingw) runtime makes it possible to even compile Qt programs for Windows 98 (which is possible with VC++ 2005 too, but it forces me to use an older compiler). And, as I might not be interested so much in Windows 98, I really am interested in providing compatibility with NT4. Or, at least, if it doesn’t offer backward compatibility I want it to be for a better reason than the C runtime. I’m sick and tired of these decisions Microsoft imposes. Just like the XP support which soon will end (actually I haven’t understood if it ends this month or in April 2009). As I understood for OEMs it ends this month. Anyway, I managed to compile the CFF’s kernel with GCC and also fixed lots of errors signalled by that compiler. Another good reason to use GCC is that it’s cross platform, meaning that a port would be much easier. The only drawback of Mingw is that it has a very small (and not up-to-date) Windows SDK, but I’m not interested in that, especially for the CFF Explorer which should become 100% platform independent. At the moment I reached 97% platform independency. My only complaint is directed to the ansi C library. My goodness, you can’t do anything with the IO functions it provides. I’m grateful that they were so kind to provide 64bit support for files: fseek64, ftello64 etc. But there are lots of things missing. For instance, I am unable to truncate a file… In a normal world that would be: FILE *f = fopen(..); ftruncate(f, len);. No, that’s not possible at all in ansi C. That really bothers me, because it forces me to write platform dependent code for my basic programming interface.

EDIT: Seems the new QFile of Qt 4.4 implements the resize method for files and that would do just fine.

Microsoft’s Rich Signature (undocumented)

In the last days I’ve been quite sick, so I decided that as long as I had to stay in bed I might at least use the time to do something useful (or quite so). What happened is that someone asked what the Rich Signature was. It might seems strange but in all these years I didn’t even notice it, I just overlooked it as part of the dos stub (incredible but true). Unable to answer, I noticed together with this person that the subject was completely undocumented. It might not even be much important, but you might find it an interesting reading after all.

http://ntcore.com/Files/richsign.htm

Since information about this topic is non-existent, the reader might not know what I’m talking about:

00000070 6D 6F 64 65 2E 0D 0D 0A 24 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 mode….$…….
00000080 E7 B3 9D E7 A3 D2 F3 B4 A3 D2 F3 B4 A3 D2 F3 B4 糝ç£Òó´£Òó´£Òó´
00000090 60 DD AC B4 A8 D2 F3 B4 60 DD AE B4 BE D2 F3 B4 ݬ´¨Òó´Ý®´¾Òó´
000000A0 A3 D2 F2 B4 F8 D0 F3 B4 84 14 8E B4 BA D2 F3 B4 £Òò´øÐó´„Ž´ºÒó´
000000B0 84 14 9E B4 3A D2 F3 B4 84 14 9D B4 3F D2 F3 B4 „ž´:Ò󴄝´?Òó´
000000C0 84 14 81 B4 B3 D2 F3 B4 84 14 8F B4 A2 D2 F3 B4 „´³Ò󴄏´¢Òó´
000000D0 84 14 8B B4 A2 D2 F3 B4 52 69 63 68 A3 D2 F3 B4 „‹´¢Òó´Rich£Òó´
000000E0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 …………….
000000F0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 50 45 00 00 4C 01 04 00 ……..PE..L.

The data between the dos stub and the PE Header. It ends with the word Rich. It is produced by microsoft VC++ compilers only and it is encrypted.